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PLEASE NOTE: the sizes given are for guidance. Before assembly check dimensions carefully. No responsibility will be accepted for scaling errors.

Ensure that both the narrow side widths and the end panel widths are equal before scoring or cutting - this must be done by measuring the print-out.

HOW TO OBTAIN THE SCANS

RIGHT-CLICK your mouse whilst pointing on an image. Select 'COPY IMAGE' and paste into a previously opened image program such as Paint Shop Pro or Photoshop. Alternatively, choose 'SAVE IMAGE AS' and place the image in a suitable folder or on your desktop for later access.

EVER-READY B103 BATTERY suitable for several post-WWII Ever Ready all-dry valve receivers including Model A, Model C, model C/A, model C/E, Model K, L26 Skyscraper.

GEC BB503 HT/LT BATTERY An alternative to the Ever-Ready B103, this battery is suitable for several post-WWII Ever Ready all-dry valve receivers including Model A, Model C, model C/A, model C/E, Model K, L26 Skyscraper.

B136 BATTERY suitable for several post-WWII-late 1950s Ever Ready all-dry valve receivers including 'Sky Queen', 'Sky King', 'Sky Prince' and 'Sky Lord'

These batteries have long been unobtainable and the owner of sets using them has to decide whether to build or buy a mains power unit or a battery-powered inverter unit, or to build his own unit - either by placing ten PP3 batteries in series for the HT section and possibly two or more 'D' cells (or similar) for the LT section, or to build a mains power unit or inverter. With any of the 'home made' choices, the casing can be disguised as an authentic battery by the use of the high definition scans  provided below.

 The scans are reproduced full-size but it is up to you to be sure that you print them to the correct scale for the B103 battery, which approximates 200mm long X 140mm high X 77 mm deep. There are flaps added in places - these are intended either to be folded around the battery box or trimmed off as waste, whichever is preferred. They are of course additional in length. Accurate sizing is important and you advised to check that the dimensions given will fit into your receiver, with special attention being given to any additional connector thickness.

Printing the scans.

This can be by ink-jet or colour laser printer, the latter being preferable if you have access to one. Ink jet prints could be laminated for durability but they will work well without this refinement. I suggest printing on card rather than paper for best results. Glue to wooden or very heavy card cases with PVA woodworking adhesive or wallpaper paste. It would also be possible to print on good quality paper and then to paste the trimmed to size sections in position on a larger card base. This would allow you to make a complete battery box (with a plain piece added for the bottom*) by scoring and folding along the edges. The default size for each scan is A4 but note that you may need to set your printer to 'resize' with one or more of the scans in order to get a correctly-sized print. Always 'print preview' to ensure that your image fills the screen and that the orientation is correct (landscape).

Ensure that both the narrow side widths and the end panel widths are equal before scoring or cutting - this must be done by measuring the print-out.

*Note that there may be no 'bottom' (or repeated large side) scan. However if desired, a second print of the large scan can be produced.

B136  B103  BB503

 

 

 

The scans are reproduced at about full-size but it is up to you to be sure that you print them to the correct scale for the B136 battery, which approximates 200mm long X 100mm high X 100mm deep. There are flaps added in places - these are intended either to be folded around the battery box or trimmed off as waste, whichever is preferred. They are of course additional in length.

Accurate sizing is important, but avoid printing out larger than the sizes given or if you do, trim back to size - to be safe, preferably slightly under, or your finished battery may not fit into your radio. Printing can be by ink-jet or colour laser printer, the latter being best if you have access to one. Ink jet prints could be laminated for durability but they will work without this refinement and when laminated, they may prove difficult to glue. An alternative might be to apply a light coat of clear spray varnish. I suggest printing on card rather than paper for best results as the latter tends to wrinkle when glued to a wooden box, as well as showing any small imperfection on the underlying timber, such as panel pin holes.

Glue to wooden cases with PVA woodworking adhesive or wallpaper paste. It would also be possible to print on good quality paper and then to paste the trimmed to size sections in position on a larger and much heavier weight card base. This would allow you to make a complete battery box using just the card (with a plain piece added for the bottom*) by scoring and folding along the edges.

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