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Radio Bygones

A top quality limited circulation magazine, edited by Mike Kenward. Covering domestic and military radio equipment including vintage transistors. Professionally produced with a straightforward and clear page presentation. Though there is an emphasis on the military side, there's articles and content to suit every vintage enthusiast and the offer of free reader adverts, plus book reviews and book sales. Engrossing reading. Contact:

Radio Bygones, Wimborne Publishing Ltd., 113 Lynwood Drive, Merley, Wimborne, Dorset BH21 1UU

Telephone: 01202 873872

Note that the web address doubles for Everyday Practical Electronics (EPE). Scroll down to Radio Bygones.

E-mail: radiobygones@wimborne.co.uk

web sites: www.epemag3.com/

The Radiophile

'The Radiophile' is an informative magazine mainly concerned with domestic valve radio and occasionally vintage TV. The editor is Chas E. Miller, well known as an authority on the subject to those of us who remember Practical Wireless and Practical Television from years back. Pretty ladies often adorn the covers but inside will be found interesting and amusing articles, projects, adverts, stories. There's altogether a very nostalgic, occasionally whimsical and quirky 'old fashioned' feel and look to this popular magazine. Almost a guilty pleasure and ideal for those of us who fondly recall the Practical Wireless years of FJ Camm. The level of technical detail in the restoration articles written by Chas is impressive. As with most limited circulation magazines, you must subscribe but you can try a copy to see how you like it first. Write to:

The Radiophile (Administration Office) , 'Larkhill', Newport Road, Woodseaves, Stafford ST20 0NP. United Kingdom.  

Telephone: 01785 284696. Fax: 01785 817744

BVWS Bulletin

This is the bulletin of the British Vintage Wireless Society, published quarterly. Membership of the society entitles you to the quality magazine. Well presented and printed in a visually sharp and somewhat minimalist manner, packed with member's own articles: so it is for the members, by the members and restoration is a major feature of these submissions.

Visit the website www.bvws.org.uk.

Practical Wireless (PW)

This title is now aimed mainly at the radio amateur but until recently did carry a regular monthly page or two devoted to vintage radio. This seems to have become sporadic of late and so I cannot be certain that it will be present in any given issue - check inside before you buy. Often the magazine carries handy advertisements for spares. The famous title seems to have ensured the magazine's survival up to the present and it is still obtainable from high street book and magazine outlets.

...and that's about the limit of availability for magazines in the UK carrying any vintage radio content. We have to face the fact that our hobby is very much a minority activity, even though many thousands of people have a passing interest in vintage TVs, radios, record players, radiograms and the like, either for nostalgic reasons or for a certainty - not always borne out by the facts - that yesterday's technology was superior to that of today. Practical Television was one of FJ Camm's Newnes publications and was initially aimed at the home constructor and hobbyist, though television servicemen soon took an interest in its essentially practical content. The growing interest shown by service people eventually led to the magazine becoming simply 'Television' and later, 'Television and Consumer Electronics' and in this role it was a loose form of trade forum, where its staple diet of common faults, new developments and servicing articles kept it going for several decades. I contributed a few items to it in the early 1980s. Eventually, the progress made in consumer electronic products overtook the magazine: suddenly, it seemed, there were far fewer servicemen still working in the trade. Repairing sets began to give way first to panel changing, then when the cost of repairs became prohibitive, simply scrapping and buying new.

Television and consumer electronics

The title finally folded after a long slow decline in readership forced several changes of ownership and editorship. It was revived in subscription form for a few months but unfortunately the subscription level never rose to a level at which the magazine was viable and publication ceased. The few copies that were produced during the short-lived revival period might turn up from time to time at vintage fairs or on Ebay. As before, the content was mainly for service trade readers (television and video technicians) but it did cover a lot of ground, including the occasional vintage item.  From this failed experiment it is unfortunately obvious that the reader base no longer exists for the subject matter.

The market for radio construction magazines has contracted out of recognition from the heady days of the 1930s - 1960s. In the 1950s, several magazines catered for the radio enthusiast and constructor. Radio was, during those years, a current hobby interest so these were never for the 'collector' in style or in content: 'Practical Wireless' and 'The Radio Constructor' catered for the broad mass of practical-minded experimenters and constructors from beginner to skilled engineer, and 'Wireless World' for the upper echelons in the industry.

Anyone around today who recalls those far-off times will feel a sense of regret at their inevitable passing, but such is the price of progress: building with transistors and microchips is fun and educational but of a different order to the construction skills needed to build valve radios and amplifiers. Even the erstwhile Practical Wireless of the great FJ Camm days has gone, replaced by the magazine that bears its title today, but aimed at the radio amateur rather than the more general and wide-ranging construction articles that graced the pages of old.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VINTAGE RADIO world: SIXTEEN YEARS OF WEB PRESENCE